Motor Assisted Scooters
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Wylie Council Approves New Scooter Ordinance

At its March 23, 2004 meeting, the Wylie City Council unanimously approved a new ordinance placing restrictions on the use and operation of motor assisted scooters. The ordinance prohibits the operation of motorized scooters on streets, alleys, and hike and bike trails for children under the age of 18 (unless the bike trail has been designated to allow scooters).

The ordinances also mandates that all children under the age of 18 wear a helmet while operating a motorized scooter; and allows motorized scooters to be ridden by children on sidewalks and to cross streets at intersections.

The ordinance strikes a balance between safety concerns and allowing motorized scooters to be used for transportation; Police Chief Jeff Butters said. While setting restrictions to the use and operation of scooters, the new ordinance also establishes penalties for violations.

During the last legislative session, the Texas Legislature passed a bill making it legal for motorized scooters to be driven on city streets where the speed limit is 35 mph or less. There is a provision in the bill for cities to pass an ordinance outlawing motorized scooters from streets, alleys, sidewalks, and hike and bike trails.

It is one of the fastest growing communities in the State of Texas with a 73% increase since 2000. Possessing an outstanding school district, low crime rates, and an expanding business climate, Wylie is the ideal place for residents looking for a small town environment with easy access to big city amenities.

Founded in 1886, the City of Wylie is located in Collin County just 24 miles from downtown Dallas. Wylie (population 26,159) is one of the fastest growing communities in the State of Texas with a 73% increase since 2000. Possessing an outstanding school district, low crime rates, and an expanding business climate, Wylie is the ideal place for residents looking for a small town environment with easy access to big city amenities.

City passes new Scooter Ordinance Most law enforcement agencies have supported restricting motorized scooters from streets for safety reasons since most scooters are ridden by children, who are often difficult to see and donít have the driving experience to make good decision. Many cities have passed scooter ordinances with various levels of restrictions or elected to go by state law.

Cities with the most restrictive ordinances have met some resistance from citizens who purchased scooters for their children to provide transportation.

Since the law passed, we have had two accidents involving young children on scooters who were exiting an alley onto a street and were struck by a car; Chief Butters said. We were fortunate that neither child was seriously injured; but we felt it was time for Wylie to adopt a scooter ordinance.

Author Notes:

Louise Mills contributes and publishes news editorial to http://www.the-scooters-report.com.  Find all kinds of mopeds, electric, gas and motorized scooters online, plus parts and accessories.

 
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